Not Letting Your Disability Get in the Way-A Moment With Author LS Beadle

 

 

It all began when I moved to Manchester with my husband Len.  I had gotten a job on the ICU at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, where I worked for a year before moving on to the High Dependency Unit. 

51-Ay3zFWjL._SX307_BO1,204,203,200_It was around this same time that I decided to learn to drive; I booked a lesson but the instructor wouldn’t let me get behind the wheel until she was satisfied that my eyesight was up to standard.  It wasn’t.  I couldn’t see the number plate from the required distance. 

From there I had my eyes tested at Boots, where I was referred to the Manchester eye hospital.  I underwent a number of tests and after two years I was diagnosed with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy, this is an inherited optic nerve disorder.

GARD (Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center) explains that Autosomal Dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is an inherited optic nerve disorder characterized by degeneration of the optic nerves. Affected people usually develop moderate visual loss and color vision defects. The severity varies and visual acuity can range from normal to legal blindness. There is currently no way to prevent or cure ADOA.

By the time I was diagnosed I had moved onto the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit.

Six years after qualifying I remained a D grade while all my friends where going up to C and B and completing their IV course so they could administer medications intravenously. I knew, by this time, that I would never be able to pass the IV course because I couldn’t see the writing on the IV vials.

I am now on the partially sighted register and have been for 12 years. I have a retired Guide Dog called Ceris who I qualified with in August 2009. My current Guide Dog, Roxy, is a 2 year old golden retriever and is full of energy. I qualified with her in August 2017.

As for being an author and being partially sighted. Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy hasn’t really stopped me from writing books. 

It has stopped me from reading some books with small print. I then require my strong magnifier; but it’s not a long term solution. Eventually it gives me a headache and I feel nauseous. I sometimes find this while I am researching the art of writing or marketing and promoting. If it’s a paperback book, the writing is sometimes far too small to read.

I normally find that when I wake up in the morning, I like to read for an hour, so I will use my Kindle because I can increase the font size. At the moment I have about 100 books waiting to be read. After reading I sit down and do my research on marketing and promoting often following the advice of an author.

In writing, I will handwrite my first and second draft of a book, then the third draft is where I add and take away things and develop the story by describing places and characters. I normally find that in a typical day I can write from 5000 to 10000 words.

I am one of those authors who feels the need to get their manuscripts edited lots of times. I can’t always tell if I’ve made a spelling mistake. When I read through what I’ve written, even though there may be a wavy line under a word, I can’t always see it.

41Kj2Ut59kL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_When creating characters for my book, I try to make sure they don’t have abnormalities. I escape my problem through my characters. Also my two main characters in my two recent releases are based on my children and I am hoping and praying that they don’t become afflicted with ADOA, although there is a 50% chance if this occurring

To answer how has ADOA affected my writing career?  Well, I have three books out there which I managed to self-publish.  As long as I can increase the font size on the computer screen then I haven’t encountered any problems so far.

For anybody out there reading this post who thinks ‘I can’t be an author, my disability would make it impossible’. Please take stock, because I’m telling you, anything is possible. If you really want to achieve something then just go for it.  I write for the love of it, and if I manage to earn money from my writing then that’s just a bonus.

You can find Leanne’s books on Amazon and B&N .

 

If you are an author, reader, or person in the industry and would like to contribute a feature piece to ACNBooks please submit your topic idea to: mkf.acnbooks@gmail.com

A Moment With Author Leanne Sally Beadle

IMG_-vuabhjLeanne Sally Beadle is a 43 year old stay at home mum and aspiring author. She lives in Keyingham, a small village near Hull in the UK with her husband Len, her two children, William 14 and Sophia 11 and a small menagerie of animals; Ceris, her 11 year old retired Guide Dog and Roxy her two year old current Guide Dog, also Mittens and Whiskers their two adorable black cats.

Leanne studied the Higher Diploma of Nursing (child) at the University of Leeds and upon qualifying she interviewed for a post on the ICU at the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital which she got.  She worked on ICU for a year, moving on to High Dependency, then the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit. Eventually, she interviewed for ward six at Booth Hall Children’s Hospital which was orthopedics and trauma.

In 2001 Leanna received a huge blow when she was diagnosed with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy.  She was registered as partially sighted and eventually had to give up working as a nurse.

51iExLxbrkL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_She wrote her first book ‘My Naughty Little Guide Dog’ in February 2016. Nine books sold mostly to friends and family. Her second book ‘William’s Wonderful World of Gaming’ was inspired by her son’s love of Gaming in particular Xbox and PC. Her third and current offering ‘ Sophia’s Wonderful World of Gymnastics was inspired by her daughter’s love of gymnastics. She is currently working on ‘Jet and the Great Snoozy Heist’

 

Next week we will take a look into Leanne’s world; one where she doesn’t let Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy hinder or discourage her from a career in writing.  In fact, in speaking to her she never gave it a chance to hold her back in any way.

Leanne Sally Beadle can be contacted on email at: leannebeadle@sky.com. Her author page can be viewed on her author page

 

 

If you are an author, reader, or person in the industry and would like to contribute a feature piece to ACNBooks please submit your topic idea to: mkf.acnbooks@gmail.com