Not Letting Your Disability Get in the Way-A Moment With Author LS Beadle

 

 

It all began when I moved to Manchester with my husband Len.  I had gotten a job on the ICU at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, where I worked for a year before moving on to the High Dependency Unit. 

51-Ay3zFWjL._SX307_BO1,204,203,200_It was around this same time that I decided to learn to drive; I booked a lesson but the instructor wouldn’t let me get behind the wheel until she was satisfied that my eyesight was up to standard.  It wasn’t.  I couldn’t see the number plate from the required distance. 

From there I had my eyes tested at Boots, where I was referred to the Manchester eye hospital.  I underwent a number of tests and after two years I was diagnosed with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy, this is an inherited optic nerve disorder.

GARD (Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center) explains that Autosomal Dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is an inherited optic nerve disorder characterized by degeneration of the optic nerves. Affected people usually develop moderate visual loss and color vision defects. The severity varies and visual acuity can range from normal to legal blindness. There is currently no way to prevent or cure ADOA.

By the time I was diagnosed I had moved onto the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit.

Six years after qualifying I remained a D grade while all my friends where going up to C and B and completing their IV course so they could administer medications intravenously. I knew, by this time, that I would never be able to pass the IV course because I couldn’t see the writing on the IV vials.

I am now on the partially sighted register and have been for 12 years. I have a retired Guide Dog called Ceris who I qualified with in August 2009. My current Guide Dog, Roxy, is a 2 year old golden retriever and is full of energy. I qualified with her in August 2017.

As for being an author and being partially sighted. Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy hasn’t really stopped me from writing books. 

It has stopped me from reading some books with small print. I then require my strong magnifier; but it’s not a long term solution. Eventually it gives me a headache and I feel nauseous. I sometimes find this while I am researching the art of writing or marketing and promoting. If it’s a paperback book, the writing is sometimes far too small to read.

I normally find that when I wake up in the morning, I like to read for an hour, so I will use my Kindle because I can increase the font size. At the moment I have about 100 books waiting to be read. After reading I sit down and do my research on marketing and promoting often following the advice of an author.

In writing, I will handwrite my first and second draft of a book, then the third draft is where I add and take away things and develop the story by describing places and characters. I normally find that in a typical day I can write from 5000 to 10000 words.

I am one of those authors who feels the need to get their manuscripts edited lots of times. I can’t always tell if I’ve made a spelling mistake. When I read through what I’ve written, even though there may be a wavy line under a word, I can’t always see it.

41Kj2Ut59kL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_When creating characters for my book, I try to make sure they don’t have abnormalities. I escape my problem through my characters. Also my two main characters in my two recent releases are based on my children and I am hoping and praying that they don’t become afflicted with ADOA, although there is a 50% chance if this occurring

To answer how has ADOA affected my writing career?  Well, I have three books out there which I managed to self-publish.  As long as I can increase the font size on the computer screen then I haven’t encountered any problems so far.

For anybody out there reading this post who thinks ‘I can’t be an author, my disability would make it impossible’. Please take stock, because I’m telling you, anything is possible. If you really want to achieve something then just go for it.  I write for the love of it, and if I manage to earn money from my writing then that’s just a bonus.

You can find Leanne’s books on Amazon and B&N .

 

If you are an author, reader, or person in the industry and would like to contribute a feature piece to ACNBooks please submit your topic idea to: mkf.acnbooks@gmail.com

A Moment With Author Leanne Sally Beadle

IMG_-vuabhjLeanne Sally Beadle is a 43 year old stay at home mum and aspiring author. She lives in Keyingham, a small village near Hull in the UK with her husband Len, her two children, William 14 and Sophia 11 and a small menagerie of animals; Ceris, her 11 year old retired Guide Dog and Roxy her two year old current Guide Dog, also Mittens and Whiskers their two adorable black cats.

Leanne studied the Higher Diploma of Nursing (child) at the University of Leeds and upon qualifying she interviewed for a post on the ICU at the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital which she got.  She worked on ICU for a year, moving on to High Dependency, then the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit. Eventually, she interviewed for ward six at Booth Hall Children’s Hospital which was orthopedics and trauma.

In 2001 Leanna received a huge blow when she was diagnosed with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy.  She was registered as partially sighted and eventually had to give up working as a nurse.

51iExLxbrkL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_She wrote her first book ‘My Naughty Little Guide Dog’ in February 2016. Nine books sold mostly to friends and family. Her second book ‘William’s Wonderful World of Gaming’ was inspired by her son’s love of Gaming in particular Xbox and PC. Her third and current offering ‘ Sophia’s Wonderful World of Gymnastics was inspired by her daughter’s love of gymnastics. She is currently working on ‘Jet and the Great Snoozy Heist’

 

Next week we will take a look into Leanne’s world; one where she doesn’t let Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy hinder or discourage her from a career in writing.  In fact, in speaking to her she never gave it a chance to hold her back in any way.

Leanne Sally Beadle can be contacted on email at: leannebeadle@sky.com. Her author page can be viewed on her author page

 

 

If you are an author, reader, or person in the industry and would like to contribute a feature piece to ACNBooks please submit your topic idea to: mkf.acnbooks@gmail.com

“I Grew Grandma’s Tomatoes” and so much more…a moment with children’s writer and illustrator, Pamela C. Rice.

Indie Beginning Podcast gets a slew of submissions that we go through, giving authors our complete anPeyPIC3ad undivided attention.  Sometimes, no matter how much we adore a book IB has to turn it down for whatever reason.  Pam Rice came across the IB desk, and as much as they adored her children’s book submission of  I Grew Grandma’s Tomatoes the podcast felt they couldn’t do the story justice when visually it is stunning! How can you see that over an audio-book format podcast? Immediately ACNBooks snatched up the opportunity to feature Ms Rice and her work as an author and illustrator.

This week we will get to know a little bit about Pam Rice and her passion for not only writing children’s books, but illustrating them!  Next week the author of I Grew Grandma’s Tomatoes will take over ACNBooks with a piece on being your own illustrator.

Creating children’s books is what Pamela C. Rice enjoys and since August 2015 she has released 12 books including When the Brown Bird Flies, The Painting Speaks, Aaron’s Dreams, and Rufus Finds A Prize. Each book is warmly illustrated by Rice and offers written artistic expression of her childhood experiences and inspirations that children will find fun, imaginative and educational.

Rice grew up surrounded by creative art and design, and believes that she is a person born to write and illustrate for children. Both Pam’s father and brother were in the field of design. Her father was a commercial artist, and her brother was in textile and artisan design. With over 30 years of independent and corporate experience in advertising, graphic design, and visual communications, Rice has earned high recognition and top accolades with over 30 design awards. She has made guest appearances as a lecturer at the Illinois Academy of Design and Merchandising and at Northeastern Illinois University. She has also taught at the University of Illinois-Chicago, in the Principal Scholar’s Program.

childrens book, pamela c. rice, african american, diverse, diversity, illustrated, effie's gift

Pam has illustrated for various authors such as Anna K. Morris, Emma Young, and Kay McCrimon, to name a few. For many years Pam has developed her unique illustrative style, and is excited to create content that both parents and children can enjoy. She is currently working with a Peruvian friend and translator to bring more diversity and inclusion to her library of books.

What was the inspiration for I Grew Grandma’s Tomatoes?

The inspiration for the book was an idea of planting and how a few seeds could yield  a plentiful harvest.

I read that you write and illustrate your books; which is your favorite part?

Because my life’s work has been art, graphics, advertising design and visual communications, I’d have to say illustrating…that’s the easy part and my favorite. 

And for you which comes first?  The drawings or the story?

When I’m coming up with the story, my mind automatically jumps to the visual. I believe that the visuals drives the story —for me.

What are you working on now?

I have a book called “Lizzy’s Purse”, that I’ve completed. I will probably release it towards the fall, because it’s season appropriate.

What drew you to children’s books?

For years I had illustrated books for various authors. I realized that my style of illustration had developed and that people would recognize immediately books I illustrated. I also would send my niece stories of events and incidents I had when I was a child, and realized that individually they would make good material for book content. I will never run out of material to write about.

What does a typical work day look like for you?

Since I am still freelance and a graphic designer, I’m working on various projects from websites to exhibits.

What does your writing space look like?

In front of my laptop, wherever I am.

Out of all the books you’ve written do you have a favorite?

Because so many of my books are stories of life experiences as a child, most are my favorite. “Whistle Watch At Uncle Willie’s House”, “I Can Smell The Rain”, “Daisy’s Bright Idea:, “Aaron’s Dream”…On the inside back cover of most of these books I include a small paragraph that explains the reason for the story.

Is there anything about the writing life that you think is misunderstood by the public?

I have to write stories that are meaningful…stories children can relate to ‘from a child’s perspective’. Some children’s books can be too simple and trifling. My stories can be read and enjoyed by adults because I weave in ‘life lessons.”

What were some of the unexpected challenges you faced on your writing journey?

Because ideas come to me in pieces, I have to thread those pieces together, so the books eventually flows together. If that doesn’t happen, I usually ‘can’ the book OR just put it to the side.

childrens book, african american, diverse, pamela c rice, little shoeshine boy

Do you have anything today that is your author “kryptonite”? Examples: Coming up with new ideas, Book readings, book signings, marketing, public speaking, touring, etc. etc. How do you handle them?

I haven’t done any book readings. Marketing, yes. A few Podcasts, no touring. I’ve been asked to get involve with some book fairs, but I am not one to set up, sit around, and personally sell books. At some point I will. My ‘library’ has grown and selling and promoting a variety of books appeals to me more than just hitting the circuit with just one book.  I’ve done the whole ‘exhibit ‘ thing with my paintings. I have had several one-woman shows with my art, and was in four galleries (Wisconsin, Chicago, Michigan)

For right now, my books have been on the ‘organic’ sell. Website, Social Media, local Whole Foods. I guess I, income way , still see it as a hobby.

I am in the process now of writing a book on African American ’adventurists’. I’ve selected some very interesting people who I know and their stories needed to be told. This is something I had been pondering for a while…a few people you may or may not of heard of. I’m hoping to complete by November.

What advice would you give to someone just beginning their career as a writer?

One needs a source to draw from, that’s important or you’re always going to run into writer’s block.

For more on Pam’s work in illustration check in next week! To get yourself a copy of one of her beautiful life lessons you can click the link here:

Pamela C. Rice’s Children’s Books

Learn how people have reacted to Pamela C. Rice’s stories on Goodreads

Curious about Pamela C. Rice? Learn more on her webpage!

 

Are you a writer, reader, or person in the publishing industry? Would you like to talk books with our followers? Email mkf.acnbooks@gmail.com with your topic idea!

Subgenres, You can never write too Many… Or Can You?

 

Episode 15, Subgenres and Author Interview

Marie and Ben discuss reviews left for last week’s Regency Romance featured beginning Brynnde by M. Pepper Langlinais as well as the author advice topic: Subgenres, You can never write too Many… Or Can You? The hosts discuss their views on the topic, theorize about J.K. Rowling switching genres and speak to the author of Brynnde about her own adventures in genre hopping. M. Pepper Langlinais gives her advice for other self-published and independently published authors concerning this topic and more. We all have stories to tell; stories to write, so write them. Write for yourself, your audience is out there and they will follow.

 


Find the full articles from this episode by clicking their links:
From the author interview:  Maggie Mackeever
Rachelle Gardner
Kimberley Grabas

Our friends at Burial Grounds Coffee Company have made this episode possible – they keep your hosts awake! Check out their coffee subscription service! Whether your favorite flavor is I’m not Perky, Mad Man, or you’re like us and love a bunch of them use their coffee subscription service to have those beans delivered on your schedule and for less! Remember to subscribe to the show on  ApplePodcasts, GooglePlay or your favorite podcast platform and leave a review, you could even help us out by rating us while you’re there; we sure would appreciate it. Music found in this episode was written and performed by Dee Yan-Key and is titled Struggle and Love.

Become part of the program. Your reviews not only let authors know how you have reacted to their work, but also helps them grow as an artist. Also, you just may find yourself on next week’s episode. Leave a review of this tale or send us an audio file to reviews.indiebeginning@gmail.com. Psst – (Whispering) An Audio review almost guarantees you a spot on next week’s episode along with a special gift. (whispering softer) but don’t tell anyone.
Submit your story. Are you an Indie Author? Let us introduce your story to the world. Click here for more details.
As always – Read more books, be the best possible you, and thanks for listening.

Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

soldier, tan, grey, freds, funeral, sandy, day, medals, statuesqueAfterlife, Memories, Family History. All of these themes arise in this weeks featured beginning, Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day. A story inspired by the author’s very own Great Uncle Fred. Would you want to hear how people remembered you after you are gone? Do you share the same memory of yourself? Listen in the backround here! This episode is brought to you from the lovely people over at burialgrounds coffee company. Find all of their unique coffee blends at burialgrounds.coffee. Remember to subscribe to the show on Stitcher, ApplePodcast or your favorite podcasting platform and leave a review! Leave a review below after the show. Reviews can also be left on Facebook, Twitter, or by sending an email to reviews.indiebeginning@gmail.com. Write them, record a MP3, even video your review; we’ll find a home for them. Thanks for listening!

Family and Thanksgiving

As the day winds down and I think back on the events from earlier I realize that I am thankful for family. I know that seems like a copout, but I don’t mean family in the usual sense, but the idea of family. My family has spread throughout the country so Marie, the boy and I spent the day with people who are not related to us in any way and accept me and my family as members. We treat each other as Cousins, Uncles, Grandparents, etc. and seem to not even notice a difference anymore. I find it amazing that humans can find so much room in their hearts to continually let people in. I hope all who read this have an opportunity to extend their family beyond the borders of DNA or law. Happy Thanksgiving everyone! I hope that everyone had a wonderful day.

-B-